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Bluest Eye

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❶One day, her son Junior manages to get Pecola into his house and then throws a cat at her. On becoming a student, each one gets a sense of freedom and adolescence.

The Bluest Eye Essay

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She was sick of having American ideals of beauty placed on her, which said that being white with blonde hair and blue eyes was what was deemed as beautiful.

Claudia receives a white baby doll for Christmas one year. Instead of adoring and cradling the new gift, as most other children would have done, Claudia, in a fit of rage, dismembered and destroyed the doll.

She hated the doll's blue eyes and blonde hair staring back at her, reminding her of how different she looked from the doll. She knew that to destroy the doll was wrong, but she could not help it. The doll, so revered for its white established ideals of what beautiful was, made Claudia hate herself for being the complete opposite of those ideals. The Breedloves are described. They think they are poor and ugly, and it says that much of the reason they think this is because of the white American media.

The media, as part of our culture, sets the standards for what defines beauty, and anything straying from these standards is viewed as ugly. Pecola is constantly faced with the standards set on her society by American culture. She cannot even enjoy a piece of candy without feeling that she is different and lacking in some way in terms of beauty.

When she goes to eat her Mary Jane candy, she is mesmerized by the little girl of Mary Jane on the cover, a blonde-haired, blue-eyed girl. These cultural pressures of what defines beauty make Pecola aware of just how much she strays from that defined beauty. This eventually leads to her desire for blue eyes, which in turn leads her into madness. When Pecola, Maureen, Claudia and Frieda are walking home from the ice cream shop, they pass a theater with a picture of Betty Grable on it.

Young girls are bombarded with American culture's ideals of beauty, such as pictures of famous actresses. Racism and beauty played big roles throughout the novel. High quality and no plagiarism guarantee! Get professional essay writing help at an affordable cost. Order a custom written paper of high quality Professional Writers only. Free Quote or Order now.

Tips for Buying a Car in University. On becoming a student, each one gets a sense of freedom and adolescence. This kind of feeling is rather tempting, as young people realize they. Public Universities vs Private Universities. Pecola's request is not for more money or a better house or even for more sensible parents; her request is for blue eyes — something that, even if she had been able to acquire them, would not have abated the harshness of her abject reality.

Pecola's story is very much her own, unique and dead-end, but it is still relevant to centuries of cultural mutilation of black people in America. Morrison does not have to retell the story of three hundred years of black dominance by white culture for us to be aware of the history of American blacks, who have been victims in this tragedy.

The self-hatred that is at the core of Pecola's character affects, in one degree or another, all of the other characters in the novel. As noted earlier, a three-hundred-year-old history of people brought to the United States during the period of slavery has led to a psychological oppression that fosters a love of everything connected with the slave masters while promoting a revulsion toward everything connected with themselves. All cultures teach their own standards of beauty and desirability through billboards, movies, books, dolls, and other products.

The white standard of beauty is pervasive throughout this novel — because there is no black standard of beauty. Standing midway between the white and black worlds is the exotic Maureen Peal, whose braids are described as "two lynch ropes. These young men, she is saying, are symbolic of all of the black men who have allowed themselves to be mesmerized by Anglo standards of beauty.

As a result, they turn on their own — just as the boys turn on Pecola. Her blackness forces the boys to face their own blackness, and thus they make Pecola the scapegoat for their own ignorance, for their own self-hatred, and for their own feelings of hopelessness.

Pecola becomes the dumping ground for the black community's fears and feelings of unworthiness. From the day she is born, Pecola is told that she is ugly.

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The Bluest Eye Toni Morrison (Born Chloe Anthony Wofford) American novelist, nonfiction writer, essayist, playwright, and children's writer. The following entry presents criticism on Morrison's novel The Bluest Eye () through For further information on her life and complete works, see CLC, Volumes 4, 10, 22, 87, and

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Bluest Eye literature essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of Bluest Eye.

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- The Importance of the Eye in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye In Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, the characters' eyes are everything. The word "eye" appears over and . In The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison tells the story of a young African American, Pecola, and the social struggles of the time period, including the difficulties of growing up as a young black woman in the s.

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In Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, both racism and beauty are portrayed in a number of ways. This book illustrates many of the racial concerns which were. The Bluest Eye is a harsh warning about the old consciousness of black folks' attempts to emulate the slave master. Pecola's request is not for more money or a better house or even for more sensible parents; her request is for blue eyes — something that, even if she had been able to acquire them, would not have abated the harshness of her abject reality.